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CAP Prize 2023

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CAP Prize 2023

Enter your work that engages with the African continent or its diaspora now and win a series of large scale outdoor exhibitions around the globe.

  • 25 artists will be shortlisted and five short listed artists awarded with the CAP Prize 2023.

The winners will be announced at Photo Basel International Art Fair in June 2023.

Image requirements: jpeg format. Your images must be in sRGB format and 100% quality. The minimum size of your images should be 2,500 pixels on the longer side. The file size of each image should not exceed 5 MB. All entrants must be able to supply a high-resolution (400dpi) and high-definition image suitable for printing in media and for an exhibition, should the work be chosen for the final selection. You may NOT submit watermarked images with your name or website visible on the photo. Please DO NOT frame your images with borders.

You are expected to submit coherent series of work. Single images are NOT permitted. Projects eligible for the CAP Prize must contain between 10 and 25 images.

Online submission of digital images via the website.

OFFICIAL WEBSITE

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS FOR YOU:
Aperture sounds like a mathematical equation you learned in middle school, but it's actually a measure of the opening your lens makes when you take a photo, which also controls the amount of light hitting your camera’s sensor. Basically, a smaller opening = less light, while a bigger opening = more light. Simple, eh?! Not really, but once you understand aperture, you can get super creative in how you photograph The size of your aperture is measured by a f/stop number. The higher your f/stop, the smaller the opening and the less light hitting the camera’s sensor. The lower your f/stop, the bigger the opening and more light that hits the sensor. Aperture also controls the depth of field (DOF) in your image. Shooting with a wide-open aperture such as f/1.4 - f/4 (a shallow depth of field) lets in more light but will result in a lot of background (and foreground) blur. This is called Bokeh and is highly desirable if shooting portraits or creative scenes. If you’re shooting with a narrow aperture such as f/9 - 16 for example, everything in your shot will be in focus- a large depth of field, but let in less light.